FAQ

Vario Infinite Dropper Seatpost Frame Fit Chart

 

 

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Vario Infinite Adjustment Bushings, Different Styles Available?

What are the two styles of height adjustment available for the Vario?

Two styles of Vario Infinite adjustment bushings have been produced, and are pictured here:

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The original bushing pictured on the left allows height adjustment to be made by rotating the bushing such that the brass keys in the seatpost land on different "steps" to adjust the extended height of the seatpost. This bushing came in early production versions of the Vario and is available for purchase in the Vario Refresh Kit - SPS20-103

The new, current bushing pictured on the right allow the extended height of the seatpost to be adjusted by adding or subtracting 5mm rings below the main bushing. This is the bushing which comes delivered stock in seatposts produced in late 2021 to current. 

 

Why did e*thirteen release a second adjustment method for the Vario seatpost?

While we always endeavor to develop and product novel products for our brand, sometimes another company beats you to the punch with a concept. In the case of our original Vario stepped bushing, we discovered after launching the product that another company had developed a nearly identical concept unbeknownst to us. As such, we have updated our design in consideration of their invention!

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How much rotational play is normal with my Vario dropper post?

 

Answer: 1-2mm when new. Additional play over the course of use can vary.

 

Dropper seatposts rely on a small gap between the brass guide keys and keyway slot to move freely and stay properly lubricated when the post is actuated. Rotational or side-to-side play in the dropper stanchion (and seat) are a result of this gap. This gap is also important to allow contaminants (dirt and grime) to be purged (as opposed to binding and damaging) from the keyway. Dropper posts with a tighter key vs keyway fit and subsequently less rotational play often are more service intensive and problematic. 

 

A new post will have 1-2mm when measured at the nose of the saddle and this is considered normal. Over the course of the first few rides, this play might increase incrementally as the system breaks in. 

 

A multitude of factors can impact the speed at which the brass guide keys wear and play increases as the post gets used. Seat tube angle, riding conditions, rider weight, and how regularly the post is getting serviced will all impact the rate at which brass guide keys wear and stanchion rotational play increases. 

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Do you make a seatpost with external routing?

Answer: No

As of today we only make the Vario dropper post with internal routing. We currently do not have plans to offer an externally routed version.

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